Creating and Animating a Simple Eye Rig

When I’ve explained the process of rigging in the past, I often start by asking the other person (or people) if he or she enjoys playing games like Chess or — for a computer gaming example — Minesweeper. It’s an apt comparison. The core mechanics of these games involve having the players logically track their way along a series of interdependent events. Rigging is a lot like that. It’s a complex task, a technical artform that simultaneously involves the logical problem-solving skills of a programmer, the usability considerations of a designer, and an animator’s eye for aesthetics. »

Using Extrude and Spin to create a Wine Glass

A classic staple of introductory modeling examples is a 3D model created by spinning the profile around a single axis. And for good reason. The process is simple enough to be done quickly while also giving you a clear understanding of a 3D program’s way of working and “thinking.” As such, it would be remiss of me not to include such an example here. To create this model, most of the heavy lifting is done with Blender’s Extrude operator, but the magic comes together when you use the Screw modifier. »

Unwrapping Your Eye and Painting a Detailed Texture

In preceding tutorial, I show you how to add basic materials to an eyeball model (created in the eye modeling tutorial). While the model looks pretty good, you can provide an additional splash of realism to it. In particular, you can get a much more detailed iris, and you can add some of the fine blood vessels around the white section of the eye. Those kinds of details are difficult to pull off with just material shaders and vertex colors. »